Video – Bermuda to Nahant – Update with new soundtrack

Our final leg back home (after over 12,000nm) brought us from Bermuda to Nahant. We had left Tioga on a mooring in Grotto Bay and were happy the she had survived the serious (60kn+) winds during our absence.
We visited the America’s Cup village to watch race day 1 of the AC finals, spent a nice afternoon at the RBYC in Hamilton looking at the beautiful club house, their collection of half-model & trophies and watched team New Zealand win even more AC races.

The highlight before we left Bermuda was the J-Class regatta where for the first time ever 7 J-Class yachts raced against each other – quite a sight.
The sail home was pleasant, the Golf Stream crossing calm and sea live to the north of it plenty.
The nice welcome by our friends and family rounded of this final leg.

Updated video with different soundtrack that hopefully plays in the US as well:

 

Previous version that includes the song “Weather with you” from Crowded House and therefore does not play in the US:

We have come full circle

After a nice meal and perfect sail into the sunset along the Cape Cod coast, we were able to sail close-hauled to Nahant (Immigrations agreed to meet us there instead of Marblehead or Gloucester).
Finishing our two year loop around the Northern Atlantic couldn’t have been a nicer sail: lots and lots of stars, beautiful sunrise, blue skies, calm sees and a perfect breeze brought it all together nicely.

Foulies and hats were replaced by t-shirts and shorts, Boston’s skyline rose behind the horizon long before we could see Nahant, the drone came out for a last spin over the ocean and familiar sites, like Graves Lighthouse (now sandblasted and looking slightly different), Egg Rock or East Point, came into sight.
We tied up on our mooring, packed, cleaned the boat, had breakfast and then headed to the dock to meet families and friends as well as the friendly Immigrations office that checked us into the US.
Of course Peter Koslowski had not forgotten about us and we enjoyed his donuts (that he could not deliver on the ocean because of equipment failure).
We were proud to have completed this adventure and large team effort.
After unloading a few tons of spare parts, tools, food, sails, scubz gear and clothes, Tioga’s waterline appeared above the water again.
We all went home, unpacked, had a shower and then got together at the Nahant Dory Club to round off the day.

A big thanks to all the spouse that let us sail this and all the previous legs!!

Tioga slideshow and presentation at Dory Club

The number of chairs squeezed into our clubhouse last night might have broken a record. It was nice so see such as large and interested crowd during our presentation of this year’s journey across the Atlantic.

Given the close connection between our tour and the various people and places in France we visited, it was good to listen to Commodore Manny’s opening statements where he found the appropriate words to address the tragedy in Paris.

Manny handed over to Philip and we continued with a couple of photos summarizing the highlights of the tour, giving us the opportunity to explain the bigger picture in words and answering questions.

Fun facts:

  • preparation took about 5 years
  • 15 people sailed the boat this year, spread over three legs, supporters: many, many more
  • we sailed about 4000nm, roughly 1/3 of the entire tour
  • highest waves: about 45ft, strongest wind: low 50s kn, highest tides: approximately 40ft
  • sailboats seen between Nahant and Azores: 0
  • near collisions with whales: 3
  • time to paint mural in Horta: 3 days
  • number of significant storms: 3
  • highest number of concurrent AIS targets: 86 (North Sea)

After that, Corinna, Ellen and Peter presented the burgees to the Dory Club that we had exchanged at various places:

  • Peter  Cafe Sport, Horta, Faial, Azores
  • Guernsey Yacht Club, Guernsey
  • Cowes Corinthian Yacht Club, Cowes
  • Island Sailing Club, Cowes

Videos for each leg followed, showing live at sea and the various places we visited.
Comments about Philip’s choice of music were minimal 😉

Photos we presented to explain overall route;

when you see dolphins jumping in deep blue water, life is good  our mark in Horta  Overall plan  Islands of the Azores we visited  Britanny and Channel Islands  Solent, Isle of Wight  A busy day on the Northsea  for 2 days we had to take every 90 min against wind in the high 20s  Kiel Canal (about 60nm)  crew of the first leg in Horta

Summary video of crew and this year’s highlights:

Where is Yahoodi?

As most people lose interest when watching hundreds photos of someone else’s trip, here is a very quick slideshow to get an idea of what this year’s trip looked like.
A teaser to our upcoming video night at the Dory Club…

From Nahant to Flores (Azores) in 2015

This was a great trip and our first Trans-Atlantic.
We left Nahant June 19th at 5pm into a low easterly breeze. After drifting through the late evening we started the engine at midnight and continued SE.

Throughout the trip we encountered three storms with sustained winds in the 30-40kn range (Emily, Linda and Candace ;-). After each one we drifted in significant swells for a while; followed by great broad reaching for days at a time. Via our weather routing software, we were able to avoid easterly winds and sailed a lot (too much) with wind from the W, which in lower winds was harder than expected as we struggled to stabilize the sails in the relatively large waves.

We saw about 20 freighters, zero sailboats, a handful of whales & turtles, a lot of dolphins & seabirds and luckily enough hardly any trash.

In total, we sailed 1858nm, ran the engine for 39hrs and consumed about 30gal diesel and 28gal of fresh water in canisters, plus more of boiled drinks from the built-in tanks (we do not have a water maker). Pasta, rice etc was boiled with sea water.
Our best Etmal (24hr run) was 179nm and lowest 111nm. Our average speed was 5.6kn, ie right on target (I plan with 5.5kn).

A couple of comments regarding our equipment:

Aries – we did not use our windvane as we did not get to practice enough with it prior to our departure. Manually steering the boat was not an issue and also faster.
Aquair100 – the hydro-generator worked very well for the first couple of days and then stopped. We believe due to a diode issue in the generator. Spare parts are on the way to Horta. We fished in the day time and used the solar panel, and then towed the turbine over night.
Solar Panel – the 80W help a lot after the hydro-generator stopped working, especially when we exhausted our batteries (we were able to recharge over 24h to get the engine going again)
iPad – great solution, in waterproof case easily usable in the cockpit. Very powerful due to its advanced apps. We did not run the boats MFD once.
iNavX – very useful and functionally rich application that we used a lot, more userfriendly waypoint (delete groups or all waypoints of a route etc) and chart handling would increase usability significantly
Weather4D Pro – outstanding app that was always spot on (so was the GFS weather model) – improvement: enable current downloads via satellite connection (we were w/out Golf Stream info after we left cellphone reception area)
AIS – while not critical for a sail on the Atlantic, it was always interesting to get details on the freighters around us, we expect a lot more use when going through the Channel
Boom-mounted preventers – a great addition to our toolkit as we where able to set strong preventers w/o having to reach to end of the boom (that most often would be out over the water and hard to reach). We also carry a pulley style preventer that was used then the main was sheeted in a lot and we did not have sufficient wind to stabilize the boom in heavy seas.

Impressions of the trip:

 DJI_0009IMG_0036 IMG_0229 (2) GOPR3656